Oct 202014
 

Cross-posted from Dr. Bill.TV

Proxmox VE 3.3

“Proxmox VE is a complete open source virtualization management solution for servers. It is based on KVM virtualization and container-based virtualization and manages virtual machines, storage, virtualized networks, and HA Clustering.

The enterprise-class features and the intuitive web interface are designed to help you increase the use of your existing resources and reduce hardware cost and administrating time – in business as well as home use. You can easily virtualize even the most demanding Linux and Windows application workloads.

Powerful and Lightweight

Proxmox VE is open source software, optimized for performance and usability. For maximum flexibility, we implemented two virtualization technologies – Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) and container-virtualization.

Open Source

VE uses a Linux kernel and is based on the Debian GNU/Linux Distribution. The source code of Proxmox VE is released under the GNU Affero General Public License, version 3 (GNU AGPL, v3). This means that you are free to inspect the source code at any time or contribute to the project yourself.

Using open source software guarantees full access to all functionalities – as well as high security and reliability. Everybody is encouraged to contribute while Proxmox ensures the product always meets professional quality criteria.

Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM)

Open source hypervisor KVM is a full virtualization solution for Linux on x86 hardware containing virtualization extensions (Intel VT or AMD-V). It is a kernel module added to mainline Linux.

With KVM you can run multiple virtual machines by running unmodified Linux or Windows images. It enables users to be agile by providing robust flexibility and scalability that fit their specific demands. Proxmox Virtual Environment uses KVM virtualization since the beginning at 2008, since 0.9beta2.

Container-based virtualization

OpenVZ is container-based virtualization for Linux. OpenVZ creates multiple secure, isolated Linux containers (otherwise known as VEs or VPSs) on a single physical server enabling better server utilization and ensuring that applications do not conflict. Proxmox VE uses OpenVZ virtualization since the beginning of the project in 2008.”

Oct 092014
 
PlayPlay

VMware announces its own OpenStack distribution, VMware embraces Docker container virtualization, Red Hat’s CEO announces a shift from client-server to cloud computing!


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Oct 092014
 

VMware announces its own OpenStack distribution, VMware embraces Docker container virtualization, Red Hat’s CEO announces a shift from client-server to cloud computing!


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Oct 042014
 

Re-posted from Dr. Bill.TV: This is VERY interesting, they are betting the farm on Cloud Computing!

Red Hat CEO announces a shift from client-server to cloud computing

ZDNet – By: Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols – “Red Hat is in the midst of changing its image from a top Linux company to the future king of cloud computing. CEO Jim Whitehurst told me in 2011 that the Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) cloud would be Red Hat’s future. Today in a blog posting, Whitehurst underlined this shift from Linux to OpenStack.

Whitehurst wrote:

Right now, we’re in the midst of a major shift from client-server to cloud-mobile. It’s a once-every-twenty-years kind of change. As history has shown us, in the early days of those changes, winners emerge that set the standards for that era – think Wintel in the client-server arena. We’re staring at a huge opportunity – the chance to become the leader in enterprise cloud, much like we are the leader in enterprise open source. The competition is fierce, and companies will have several choices for their cloud needs. But the prize is the chance to establish open source as the default choice of this next era, and to position Red Hat as the provider of choice for enterprises’ entire cloud infrastructure.

In case you haven’t gotten the point yet, Whitehurst states, ‘We want to be the undisputed leader in enterprise cloud.’ In Red Hat’s future, Linux will be the means to a cloud, not an end unto itself.

He’s not the only Linux leader who sees it that way. Mark Shuttleworth, Canonical and Ubuntu’s founder, agrees. If you read Shuttleworth’s blog, you’ll see he focuses far more on Ubuntu’s inroads into the cloud than, say, Ubuntu on the smartphone or tablet.

They both have excellent reasons for seeing it this way. With the exception of Microsoft Azure, all other cloud platforms rely on Linux and open source software. Amazon’s cloud services, for example, run on top of Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

So neither Linux leader is walking too far away from Linux. Shuttleworth, for example, is quite proud that Ubuntu is the leading Linux OS on OpenStack. Whitehurst was quick to note that ‘Red Hat Enterprise Linux is easily the best operating platform in the world, counting more than 90 percent of the Fortune 500 as customers.’

Linux leaders see a future where IT is based on Linux and the open source cloud. And if Whitehurst has his way, it will be a Red Hat-dominated future.”

Sep 162014
 

Well, we were wondering what Docker meant for VMware, now, it seems, VMware is OK with Docker!

VMware Embraces Docker Container Virtualization

eWeek – By: Sean Michael Kerner – “The open-source Docker container virtualization technology has a new ally today. VMware announced a new partnership with Docker, Google and Pivotal to enable container technology in VMware environments. The news was formally announced at the VMworld conference in a keynote by VMware CEO Pat Gelsinger and discussed in a follow-up press conference. Among the key value propositions of Docker is that unlike a virtual machine (VM) hypervisor like VMware’s ESX, each application does not require its own underlying operating system. VMware and Docker, however, need not necessarily be competitive technologies, and each can be used to complement the other. ‘The best way to deliver containers is through a virtual machine,’ Gelsinger said during his keynote.

The basic idea is that running Docker containers on VMware VMs offers enterprises the best of both worlds. Developers can embrace the rapidly moving Docker world with its benefits, while still being able to leverage existing VMware workflows.

One of the biggest backers of Docker containers is Google, which is also part of the new VMware/Docker partnership effort. Craig McLuckie, product manager at Google, said during a press conference that the new partnership will enable a way to bring the container style of application management to the world. Google sees VMs and Docker as being very complementary, he added.

‘The virtual machine offering provides a very strong way to provision and manage basic infrastructure,’ McLuckie said, ‘while containers exist in the application space and provide a very nice way to package and deploy applications.’

McLuckie said that Google is already using VMs and containers together for a number of reasons, noting that VMs provide a very strong isolation boundary for security.

‘I’m not saying that containers don’t offer some benefits from a security perspective, but we really like that strong VM hypervisor boundary,’ he said. ‘VMware spent 15 years making it extremely robust.’

Ben Golub, CEO of Docker Inc., the lead commercial sponsor behind the open-source Docker project, said during the press conference that the partnership with VMware is fundamentally about choice.

‘No matter who the customer is, we want them to be able to deploy Docker in the environment that makes sense for them,’ he said.

Golub stressed that Docker has been enterprise-ready since at least its 1.0 release, which debuted on June 9. He added that people deploy Docker on bare metal, on the public cloud, in every flavor of Linux and now on every virtualization platform as well.

One of the promises of Docker is the improved efficiency over VMs, by not needing to run separate operating systems for each application. It’s a promise that still holds true when running Docker on top of VMware. Golub noted that when users start adopting containers, they don’t have the overhead of a guest operating system.

‘So instead of having a thousand applications running on a thousand different VMs, you can have a thousand different applications running in containers spread across a limited number of VMs,’ Golub said. ‘As a result, you can get the best of both worlds.’

Sep 022014
 

VMware has announced their own branded version of OpenStack, called VMware Integrated OpenStack (VIO).

VMware Announces Its Own OpenStack Distribution

eWeek – By: Sean Michael Kerner – “VMware has been one of the top contributors to the open-source OpenStack cloud platform over the last several years, and now the company is taking the next logical step by announcing its own OpenStack distribution. The new VMware Integrated OpenStack (VIO) offering, formally announced at the VMworld conference Aug. 25, provides a new option in the increasingly competitive space for OpenStack products and services. Dan Wendlandt, director of product management for OpenStack at VMware, is helping to lead the new VIO effort. Wendlandt is a well-known name in OpenStack circles, having helped get the OpenStack Neutron networking project started (originally under the name Quantum) back in 2011. In addition to its leadership in OpenStack networking, VMware has made multiple contributions to other areas of OpenStack, including compute and storage, over the years. VMware has been supportive of OpenStack for years at the highest levels of the company. In 2012, then VMware CTO Steve Herrod publicly expressed his support for VMware technologies running OpenStack. And VMware’s current CEO, Pat Gelsinger, commented in August of 2013 that he saw OpenStack as being highly complementary to VMware and that his company would be building out additional support.

Wendlandt told eWEEK that in the past, VMware had only talked about its community contributions to OpenStack but is now taking its involvement to the next level. For VMware, OpenStack is all about enabling choice for its users.

‘The goal with VIO is to make OpenStack an extremely well-integrated aspect of the VMware product portfolio,’ Wendlandt said.

What VIO is in a nutshell is the open-source OpenStack code with VMware drivers, as well as an OpenStack-specific management tool and reference architecture. Wendlandt explained that the management tool handles installation and upgrades. Additionally, VMware’s management suite, including vCenter Operations Manager and Log Insight, will gain OpenStack awareness, providing new visibility for users into OpenStack environments.

‘The key thing here to note is that OpenStack itself isn’t solving all enterprise use cases and requires additional management wrapped around it,’ Wendlandt said. ‘That’s why we’re delivering an entire package, providing customers with a single contact for support.’

VMware integration into OpenStack itself is not a new thing. Multiple existing OpenStack distributions including Piston, Suse, Ubuntu and Mirantis all support VMware technologies running on OpenStack. All existing vendor partnerships for OpenStack support on VMware will continue, Wendlandt said.

‘What the other OpenStack distribution support represents is the ability to use OpenStack as a framework to combine loosely coupled components,’ he explained. ‘VIO is about giving our customers an option for a much more tightly integrated product, a single contact for support and deep management integration to simplify installation.’

Wendlandt stressed that VIO as well as the various OpenStack distributions that also support VMware are all based on the same upstream open-source code. VMware’s goal is not to provide different OpenStack bits, but rather to deliver a specific package focused on VMware technologies.

While VMware is announcing its VIO product today, it is not yet announcing packaging options or pricing at this time.

‘What we’re announcing is the availability of a private beta, but broader pricing and packaging will not be announced until we’re ready for a General Availability [GA] release,’ Wendlandt said.”

Sep 012014
 
PlayPlay

Cloud Computing World Magazine debuts, who’s using Docker? Flocker storage for Docker, small business and Cloud Computing, VMware acquires CloudVolumes, vMotion even more powerful in vSphere 6, Microsoft Azure major outage, Jailhouse: a new hypervisor.


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Sep 012014
 

Cloud Computing World Magazine debuts, who’s using Docker? Flocker storage for Docker, small business and Cloud Computing, VMware acquires CloudVolumes, vMotion even more powerful in vSphere 6, Microsoft Azure major outage, Jailhouse: a new hypervisor.


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Aug 312014
 

Yet another hypervisor? Well, at least this one is complimentary!

After Xen and KVM, meet a new Linux hypervisor: Jailhouse

InfoWorld – By: Serdar Yegulalp – “In the world of hypervisors for Linux, a couple of names have come to the fore over time: Xen and KVM. But a new hypervisor called Jailhouse, designed for safety-critical and real-time use cases, made its public debut this week.

Originally announced late last year by Jan Kiszka, a consultant and software engineer at Siemens Corporate Technology, Jailhouse is a partitioning hypervisor that can run other OSes or applications designed for bare metal. To run it, one boots a conventional Linux system, starts Jailhouse, then partitions the system’s resources to different ‘cells’ that are each isolated from the others.

Unlike other hypervisors, though, Jailhouse is ‘optimized for simplicity rather than feature richness,’ as its GitHub notes put it. Functions like overcommitment of memory or CPU, for instance, aren’t supported.

The GitHub notes for the project indicate that Jailhouse is very much a work in progress with its 0.1 release. However, ‘all major features required to use Jailhouse on Intel x86 CPUs are now available,’ according to the project mailing list. According to Kiszka, the smaller code base (and feature set) of Jailhouse makes it easier to maintain and certify for various safety standards.

Jailhouse’s bare-bones approach is meant to make it more of a complement to existing and mature hypervisor technologies, rather than a replacement for them. ‘There are commercial hypervisors targeting at similar use cases [embedded and real-time systems], while Jailhouse is an open source effort,’ Kiszka said.

The main applications for Jailhouse, according to Kiszka, are ‘consolidated control systems’ – machine control, railway systems, energy generation/distribution, and so on. He noted that enterprise use ‘is typically not overlapping with our (currently foreseeable) user group.’ But added, ‘We don’t want to exclude Jailhouse applications beyond our current scope; that’s one reason why we opened it to the public.’

Kiszka noted that there’s growing interest in Jailhouse within telecom, for its hosting high-speed, low-latency networking functions — which hints as to how Jailhouse could in time be adopted more directly by enterprises. If Jailhouse were to find a foothold in the enterprise environment, it wouldn’t be the first time an open source technology not directly intended for enterprise use took off there.”

Aug 302014
 

They are going to have to get this fixed before their “Cloud OS” version of Windows comes out. Can you imagine if you couldn’t use your PC for five hours!

Microsoft’s cloud-computing service has five-hour outage

Bloomberg News – By: Jack Clark – “Microsoft’s Azure cloud-computing service, a critical part of Chief Executive Satya Nadella’s plan to remake the software company, experienced a major global outage Monday that lasted for around five hours.

Azure, which lets businesses access computing resources and run programs via the Internet, was restored after a disruption that affected at least six major components in multiple data centers, the world’s biggest software maker said on its website.

Microsoft’s cloud-computing service, which competes against rival businesses from Google and Amazon.com, also experienced some outages in August. It’s unusual for cloud-service suspensions to affect more than one data center at once, and this is Microsoft’s most severe Azure interruption since some storage tools went offline in February 2013.

Azure is a key part of the ‘cloud OS,’ a term Nadella uses to describe the different technologies Redmond, Washington- based Microsoft can bring together to give customers a consistent experience across different devices. The cloud division, which contains Azure, has an implied annual revenue of about $4.4 billion, Amy Hood, Microsoft’s chief financial officer, told Bloomberg in July.

Nadella, who built up Microsoft’s cloud-computing business before he was promoted to CEO in February, seldom misses an opportunity to promote Azure, which is part of his “Mobile First, Cloud First” strategy. Nadella’s latest plug for Azure was earlier this month, when he participated in the Ice Bucket Challenge and doused himself with ice-cold water to raise awareness for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. He challenged the CEOs of Amazon and Google to do the same.

‘Oh man, oh my God, that is cold!,’ Nadella said after being drenched with water. ‘Now let me challenge Jeff Bezos and Larry Page. From personal experience, I can say it’s better to have your head in the clouds than in a bucket of ice.’

Azure has enabled Microsoft to partner with other companies. Last year, Microsoft and Oracle said businesses would be able to buy middleware and database products from Oracle on the Azure cloud. In May, Microsoft announced a similar agreement with Salesforce.com Inc.”